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9 Foot Gator Pulled From Temple Terrace Pool

6/18/2016 -- TEMPLE TERRACE (FOX 13) - A 9-foot alligator made its way into the pool of a Hillsborough County home Wednesday, and the homeowner watched as trappers removed the persistent fellow.

Elizabeth Foster recorded video as trappers wrestled the gator out of the pool and into her yard. She said it appeared the reptile broke through the screen enclosure to get into the water.

As trappers wrestled the animal, Foster wrestled with what to name her temporary pet, which the trappers estimated to weigh 250 pounds. She settled on Loch Ness for his name.

9-foot alligator pulled from Temple Terrace pool
After finally getting the alligator out of the pool and into the yard, they measured it and let the homeowner and another onlooker touch its tail

 

Study: Public pools teeming with bacteria, other dangers

6/18/2016 -- TAMPA (FOX 13) - After a first-of-its-kind study, the CDC has released new information about pool safety, and the report isn't good. 

Inspectors collected data in five states -- Arizona, California, Florida, New York, and Texas -- from a total of  84,187 inspections at 48,632 public aquatic facilities. Sixty-six percent of these inspections were of public pools. Hot tubs, wading pools, and interactive water play venues for children were included as well.

After tallying thousands of pieces of data collected in 2013, the CDC found about 80-percent of public pool sites had at least one, sometimes more, code violations. The most common problems were things like incorrect pH levels and safety equipment issues. 

Study: Public pools teeming with bacteria, other dangers

The CDC also found, 1 in 8 inspections ended up with an immediate pool closure. So, what should an average pool-goer do to stay safe and healthy? 

"I think these numbers should be concerning to parents," said FOX 13's Dr. Jo, who echoed the CDC's recommendation of bringing PH strips to pools to self-test the levels.

Proper PH and chlorine levels can help prevent nasty bacteria that can make you sick. 

 

Two hurt in chemical explosion while mixing pool chemicals

18 June 2016 - A Bargersville couple is recovering after a pool cleaning solution blew up inside their house this week.

A picture of the aftermath shows the kitchen window blown out, chemicals splattered all over the walls and cabinets and the kitchen sink blasted into the cabinet below.

Bargersville Fire Chief Jason Ramey said the homeowners were in the kitchen mixing up a cleaning solution for their pool late Tuesday, when they made a dangerous mistake.

"They had two compounds of pool shock. They just happened to be different manufacturers. One was a brand A, one is a brand B. They mixed those powders together and once they applied the water, there was a some sort of chemical reaction that caused that explosion within the home," explained Ramey.

The husband and wife got out of the house quickly as a cloud of chemicals spread. They were hospitalized for minor chemical burns, chemical inhalation and temporary hearing loss.

"Honestly, it could've been worse," said Allie Shrum, General Manager at Angie's Pool & Spa.

The shop carries four different brands of pool shock and each one has a different active ingredient. Shrum said you should never mix brands, because there is almost always a reaction.

However, you should pour the chemical directly into the pool, she said, so it dilutes into a large body of water. And above all, she urged homeowners to ask a professional for help when handling pool chemicals.

"They can be dangerous. They can be harmful. It's better to be safe than sorry," said Shrum.

FOX59 spoke to one of the victims over the phone. He did not want to be identified, but hoped others would learn from his experience.

Chief Ramey called the blast "catastrophic" and an innocent mistake that did not end well.

"This was 'I'm gonna mix these two, because I've got a little bit of each and make it work,' and it just did not happen that way," he said.

Man Risks Life Jumping Off Roof Into Pool


This is the heart-stopping moment a thrill seeker risks his life by leaping from a 55ft-tall hotel into a 6ft-deep swimming pool.

Daredevil Robbie Favre, 25, jumped from the top of the building in Tampa, Florida, and luckily landed in the narrow pool just two seconds later.

The extreme sports addict didn't even hesitate as he ran off the side of the roof and lost his baseball cap in mid-air before he made a splash in the swimming pool.

And the bartender soon made a dash for a waiting car parked outside because he hadn't even booked a room there.

Mr Favre, 25, said: 'It's just something I do for fun. I've made a bit of a habit out of it now and it's really just a bit of fun.

'I'd visited Clearwater Beach a few weeks earlier for a couple of days and I thought this was a perfect spot to jump.

'The key is just to have no fear. I took a couple of peaks over the edge but I was up there and down in two minutes.

'It's a pretty crazy feeling going through the air. Sometimes it takes a couple of seconds to realise: "Woah, I'm higher than I thought I was".

Boy, 10, saves life of friend, 9, found at bottom of pool

WINTER HAVEN, Fla. (WFLA) — A quick-thinking 10-year-old boy is being credited with saving another boy’s life after pulling him from the bottom of a Winter Haven swimming pool.

Winter Haven police responded to a call about a near-drowning at 8 p.m on Friday at the Winter Haven Inn and Suites, 1150 3rd St SW, Winter Haven.

Investigators say Thomas Ingram, Jr., 9, was with Larry Wagner, 10, in the pool. Wagner was swimming laps while Ingram stayed in the shallow area. After swimming a few laps around the pool, Wagner was playing at the ladder in the deep area when he saw Ingram at the bottom of the pool not moving.

Wagner, knowing Ingram could not swim, dove to the bottom of the pool and scooped Ingram up from the deep end. As he pulled Ingram to the side of the pool, he made sure Ingram’s head was out of the water.

At the same time, Wagner was screaming out, “drowner, drowner” which got the attention of a family friend who was also at the pool.

Charlie Camiel Jr., a friend of the Ingram family, and another man at the pool jumped in and helped get Ingram out of the pool. Property security member Jose Velez rushed over and started CPR on Ingram.

During CPR, a call was made to 911. Emergency personnel arrived a short time later and took over administering CPR. A pulse was finally obtained and Ingram was flown by helicopter to St Joseph’s Hospital in Tampa.

On Saturday morning, Ingram was in stable condition at the hospital.

Winter Haven police praised Wagner’s quick reaction. “I am certain that the quick thinking of Wagner saved this boy’s life,” said Chief Charlie Bird. “Without his fast response and perseverance in the time of emergency, this could have certainly had a different outcome.”