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64E-9.004 Operational Requirements

Below are the Operational requirements for pool chemistry in Hillsborough county.

(1) Water Quality – The water supply for all pools shall be an approved potable water system or shall meet the requirements for potable water systems by the submission from the operator of bacteriological and chemical laboratory reports to the county health department. Salt water sources are exempt from the potable water chemical standards except for iron and color requirements.

(a) Cross-connection prevention – An atmospheric break or approved back flow prevention device shall be provided in each pool water supply line that is connected to a public water supply. Vacuum breakers shall be installed on all hose bibbs.

(b) Bacteriological quality – The pool water shall be free of coliform bacteria contamination.

(c) Clarity – The pool water shall be 0.5 or less NTU and the main drain grate must be readily visible from the pool deck.

(d) Chemical quality – Chemicals used in controlling the quality of the pool water shall be tested and approved using the National Sanitation Foundation (NSF-ANSI) Standard 60-2005, Drinking Water Treatment Chemicals-Health Effects dated September, 2005, which is incorporated by reference in these rules and shall be compatible with other accepted chemicals used in pools. The following parameters shall be adhered to for pool water treatment:

1. pH – 7.2 to 7.8.

2. Disinfection – Free chlorine residual shall be 1 milligram per liter (mg/L) to 10 mg/L, inclusive, in conventional swimming pools and 2 mg/L to 10 mg/L, inclusive, in all other type pools such as spa-type pools and interactive water fountains; bromine residual shall be 1.5 mg/L to 10 mg/L, inclusive, in conventional swimming pools and 3 mg/L to 10 mg/L, inclusive, in all other type pools. Except that, the following maximum disinfectant levels shall apply to indoor conventional swimming pools: 5 mg/L free chlorine or 6 mg/L bromine.

3. When oxidation-reduction potential controllers are required, the water potential shall be kept between 700 and 850 millivolts. Use of these units does not negate the manual daily testing requirement of subsection 64E-9.004(13), F.A.C.

4. Cyanuric acid – 100 mg/L maximum in pools, with 40 mg/L as the recommended maximum, and 40 mg/L maximum in spa pools.

5. Quaternary ammonium – 5 mg/L maximum.

6. Copper – 1 mg/L maximum.

7. Silver – 0.1 mg/L maximum.

(e) Landscape irrigation water that wets the wet deck area of the pool, the pool itself, enters the collector tank, or wets an interactive water feature must be potable water from a public water system.

(2) Manual addition of chemicals will be allowed under special conditions and requires that the pool be closed prior to addition and for at least 1 hour period after addition or a longer period as necessary for sufficient and safe distribution of the chemical. After treatment for breakpoint chlorination and algae prevention, use of the pool can be resumed when the free chlorine levels drop to 10 mg/L.

(3) Cleanliness – The pool and pool deck shall be kept free from sediment, floating debris, visible dirt and algae. Pools shall be refinished when the pool surfaces cannot be maintained in a safe and sanitary condition.

(4) Food and beverages are prohibited in the pool and on the pool wet deck area; animals and glass containers are prohibited within the fenced pool area, or 50 feet from pool edge when no fence exists.

(5) The pool re-circulation system must be operated at all times when the pool is open for use. The re-circulation system may be shut off three hours after the pool closes but must resume operation three hours before opening the pool. Shut down time must be controlled by a time clock.

(6) The pool water level must be maintained at an elevation suitable for continuous skimming without flooding during periods of non-use.

(7) All equipment and appurtenances shall be kept in good repair.

(8) When use of a public swimming pool requires an admission or a membership fee, the most recent pool inspection report shall be posted in plain view of existing and potential members and patrons.

(9) Sanitary facilities shall be maintained in a clean and sanitary condition and sanitary supplies such as toilet paper, paper towels or blow dryer, soap and waste baskets shall be provided.

(10) Footbaths are prohibited.

(11) Test kits are required to be on the premises of all pools to determine free active chlorine and total chlorine using N,N-Diethyl-p-Phenylenediamine (DPD), or bromine level, total alkalinity, calcium hardness, and pH.

(a) The following test kits shall be provided if the corresponding chemicals are used: cyanuric acid, sodium chloride, quaternary ammonium, ozone and copper.

(b) When silver is added as a supplemental disinfectant, a water analysis must be done every six months and be submitted to the department upon request.

(c) A test kit may be used for multiple pools, provided the pools have common ownership and they are located on contiguous property.

(d) The test kit shall be capable of measuring the level of disinfectant in the normal operating range.

(12) Activity accessories such as volleyball and basketball nets may be used for designated times provided a clear four foot deck area is maintained behind the structures. When the pool is open for general use such accessories must be removed.

(13) The keeping of a daily record of information regarding pool operation, using the Monthly Swimming Pool Report – DH 921 3/98, obtained from the local county health department, shall be the responsibility of the pool owner or operator. Customized report forms may be substituted provided they contain the appropriate information and are acceptable to the department. The completed report shall reflect manually conducted pool water tests for pH and disinfectant levels at least once every 24 hours, and weekly testing for cyanuric acid when chlorinated isocyanurates are used at spas and pools, and shall be retained at the pool or submitted monthly as required by the local health department. DH 921, 3/98, may be obtained at the local county health department. For the purposes of daily testing of the pool water and keeping of the Monthly Swimming Pool Log, the requirements of Rule 64E-9.018, F.A.C., are not applicable.

(13) The keeping of a daily record of information regarding pool operation, using the Monthly Swimming Pool Report – DH 921 3/98, obtained from the local county health department, shall be the responsibility of the pool owner or operator. Customized report forms may be substituted provided they contain the appropriate information and are acceptable to the department. The completed report shall reflect manually conducted pool water tests for pH and disinfectant levels at least once every 24 hours, and weekly testing for cyanuric acid when chlorinated isocyanurates are used at spas and pools, and shall be retained at the pool or submitted monthly as required by the local health department. DH 921, 3/98, may be obtained at the local county health department. For the purposes of daily testing of the pool water and keeping of the Monthly Swimming Pool Log, the requirements of Rule 64E-9.018, F.A.C., are not applicable.

(14) Should a human fecal accident occur, the pool operator or owner shall comply with all recommendations found in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) “Fecal accident response recommendations for Aquatics Staff” dated February 15, 2008, found on the department’s internet website: http://www.floridashealth.org/Environment/water/swim/index.html. Alternative emergency disinfection methods developed by industry, or by the application of new disinfection technology, or by the use of chemical disinfectants that are effective, safe and appropriate for public bathing facilities, and are approved by the CDC, may also be used.

(15) For pools used at night or when adequate natural lighting is not available, the lighting requirements of paragraph 64E-9.006(2)(c), F.A.C., shall be met.

Rulemaking Authority 381.006, 514.021 FS. Law Implemented 381.006, 514.021, 514.03, 514.031, 514.05, 514.06 FS. History–New 10-5-93, Formerly 10D-5.133, Amended 12-27-98, 5-27-04, 5-24-09.

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Swimming Pool Lagoons Coming to Tampa Bay

Metro Development Group is partnering with Crystal Lagoons Corp. to bring the giant swimming pools or "lagoons" to four planned communities in Hillsborough, Pasco and Lee counties. The first is set to break ground at the end of the year on the old Epperson Ranch property in Pasco, bought by Metro about five years ago.

Accessible to 10,000 homes altogether, the four lagoons in the Metro communities will range from 5 to 10 acres in size. On the low end, that's about the same size as four football fields, and on the high end, 71/2. To get a sense of the scale: an Olympic-size swimming pool occupies 0.3 acres.

Though the Metro pools won't be quite as big as Crystal Lagoons' San Alfonso del Mar seawater pool in Chile (19.77 acres, with enough water to fill 6,000 regular pools, which currently holds the record for biggest pool in the world), residents can still kayak, paddleboard and swim in the waters.

"There will be something for everybody in the family," said Metro president Greg Singleton. "Beach cabanas for the adults, 6- to 8-foot-deep water for teens to do water sports, a zero-entry for the kids so they can walk out into water — all in the same lagoon."

With the Gulf of Mexico and beaches consistently ranked the best in America a car ride away, why go with the lagoons?

Singleton says the advantage is privacy and convenience.

"I don't know where you live but where I live in Tampa, it's a 45-minute drive to the beach. And then, it's 'where am I going to park' and 'I've got to load up all my gear, grab the kids,' and then 'I've got to find a place on the beach.' In this case, there's crystal clear water, a beach experience in my backyard that's exclusively for my community," Singleton said. "It's better than the beach."